The french Christmas Logs ” la Buche de Noël”

Recipe Story
The Bûche de Noël, also known as the Yule Log, is a traditional French dessert served during the Christmas holidays. Made from sponge cake; this rolled cake can be filled and frosted with everything from butter cream to rich chocolate ganache. The cake is decorated to resemble a log by creating a bark-like texture with the outer frosting, sprinkling powdered sugar to resemble “snow”, and crafting “mushrooms” out of meringue or marzipan as a final garnish. It’s no wonder this beautiful (and delicious!) cake has been around since Napoleon I!!! Enjoy and Merry Christmas everyone from Bertrand Munier

Ingredients
What You Will Need
1/2 cup cake flour
1/4 cup cornstarch
3 large eggs plus 3 large egg yolks
3/4 cup granulated sugar
Pinch of salt

nstructions
Preparing the Plain or White Génoise

1. Cover the cooled layer with a clean piece of parchment paper, and then
cover the paper with a clean sheet pan
2. Whisk the eggs, yolks and salt in the bowl of an electric mixer. Add
sugar in a stream while whisking
3. Place bowl over a pan of simmering water and gently whisk until the
egg mixture is lukewarm. Whip by machine on high speed until the egg
mixture is cold, light yellow in color and increased in volume. Remove
the bowl from the mixer and sift the cake flour mixture over the egg
mixture, in a few additions, and fold in with a rubber spatula
4. Pour the batter into the prepared pan and smooth the top evenly with
a spatula
5. Bake the layer for 10-12 minutes. Be careful NOT TO OVER BAKE!!
6. Loosen the cake with a sharp knife from the sides of the pan and invert
to a rack; immediately invert again so that the cake layer cools on clean
paper right-side up

For Chocolate Génoise
Substitute 1/3 cup cake flour, 1/3 cup cornstarch, 1/4 cup unsweetened
cocoa powder, and a pinch of baking soda for the dry ingredients used in
the plain génoise. Continue to use 1/4 granulated sugar, 3 large eggs
and 3 large egg yolks, and a pinch of salt.

Preparing the Cake
1. Cover the cooled layer with a clean piece of parchment paper, and then
cover the paper with a clean sheet pan
2. Invert the cake between the pans
3. Lift off the top pan, and peel off the paper stuck to the bottom of the
cake layer
4. Replace the just removed parchment with a clean piece of paper
covering the cake, and place a sheet pan on top of it
5. Invert the pans again; remove the top pan, and parchment paper. The
cake layer now rests on a clean piece of parchment
Assembling the Bûche
1. Spread the filling of your choice (flavored whipped cream, butter
cream, ganache) on the layer with a metal spatula
2. With the long edge of the layer closest to you, roll the layer by picking
up the edge of the paper and easing the layer into a curve
3. Continue to use the paper to roll the layer into a tight cylinder
4. Wrap the paper tightly around the roll, and twist the ends like a piece
of wrapped candy
5. Refrigerate for 2 hours (1 hour in the freezer) so cake can “set”
6. Remove the rolled cake from the refrigerator and unwrap
7. Trim the edges diagonally, cutting one piece to be 2 inches in length
from the end of the log
8. Place the roll on a platter, and position the uncut end of the 2 inch
piece about two thirds along the top side of the roll, making a short
“branch” or “knot”
9. Cover the bûche with butter cream, ganache, or whipped cream
(whipped cream is not the usual choice for the outer covering), making
sure to cover the curve up the protruding branch on top of the log
10. Leave the branch ends unfrosted, or frost one of the two ends. Always
leave the protruding branch end unfrosted

11. “Streak” the butter cream with a fork or decorating comb
12. Dust plate sparingly with confectioners’ sugar to have “snow”
13. Cut diagonal slices to serve
14. ENJOY!
Bertrand Munier

How living in France changes your lifestyle..

Whether for better or for worse, many foreigners find that their habits alter when they move to France. Here, a few veteran expats share their experiences of how French culture has changed their lifestyles.

For Janine Marsh, editor of The Good Life France, it’s her attitude towards meal times that has altered the most since moving to France.

“During my 15-minute lunch ‘hour’ in London, I’d rush to do my shopping, pay cheques into the bank, phone the utility services, etc,” she recalls.

In France, however, time off for lunch is sacred

eclaire idealparty

“For two hours, banks and shops close. Road workers, doctors, butchers, bakers, candlestick-makers simply va va voom at lunchtime to the restaurant of choice.”

Any tips? Visit you local council office before the lunch break, advises Janine, if you want to get anything important done.

There may be increasing fears over the rise in binge-drinking in France, but there’s still a big difference between the British and Gallic drinking culture, according to “A Year in the Merde” author Stephen Clarke.

“I now drink much less than British friends, who are capable of sinking twice as many pints as me during an evening. France just isn’t as much of a binge-drinking culture (though it’s now taking root here),” says Clarke.

Colin Randall, editor of France Salut and the former France correspondent for the Daily Telegraph, has also noticed a change in his drinking habits.

“I think nothing of having something from the trolley on the train into London from airports but never even think of looking for a pre-flight bar in France,” says Randall.

Piu Eatwell, the British expat author of They Eat Horses, Don’t They, agrees.

“A decade of Gallic influence means that I now almost never drink spirits such as whisky or gin, and certainly not as an ‘apéritif’. The only pre-dinner drinks I drink now are Champagne or Kir,” she says.

“I pretty much exclusively drink wine, and only ever accompanied by some sort of food (generally at meal times, or with an apéro).”

Quality over quantity

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Paris-based American writer Lindsey Tramuta, who runs the Lost in Cheeseland blog says she’s learned to value quality above all else.

“My base expectations on quality – ingredients, craftsmanship, experiences – have gotten higher since living in France these last nine years.

“Surrounded by artisans in everything from food to home goods who themselves place a premium on quality, has indeed influenced my own consumption habits. Buy less, buy better.”

Author Stephen Clarke says he’s abandoned the weekly supermarket shop since moving to France.

“I go food shopping every day rather than filling up a supermarket trolley and trying to live off the contents for a week.

“Sometimes I go out and buy fresh bread twice a day, straight from the oven. My whole idea of freshness has changed.

more ….

a bientot

Bertrand Munier

www.bertrandmunier.co.uk 

 

Canapes Party ? the Elegant French touch !

Our Canapés  are delicious , seasonal and tasty morsels creations which are freshly prepared from the highest quality products.

canapes be bertrand munier
by chef bertrand munier

For Private party our canapes got they final french touch on site times before serving , to ensure Bertrand’s Vision of taste, texture and color can be realised by you in every bite.

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Canapes by ideal party
canapes
canapes by Ideal party

For the delivery service our canapes are made fresh on the day on our special packaging design by us .

canapes from ideal party
canapes from ideal party

Chef Bertrand Munier  will help create a perfect custom menu for your party. We will advise you on the size and content of your menu, regarding the logistics of the game ( number of guests, location and hours) . Seasonal canapes  can be found here.

Retail balances and presenting elegant Canapés with practicality . Part of 350 customers place needs a different approach to a private party for 20 .

a bientot

Bertrand Munier

http://www.bertrandmunier.co.uk/

food party entertaining ! Poached salmon on belle Vue.

POACHED SALMON ON BELLE VUE

PORTIONS £7.20

minimum order 8 portions on shopping basket

A whole side of skinless & boneless Scottish salmon, poached fish stock with lemon, garnished with king prawns.

Served with mayonnaise and cocktail sauce

Delivered in a Disposable Packaging

For food ready to serve on presentation trays , Please contact us,VAT will be applied on this service.

Serves 8 portions as a main course and 12 as part of a buffet.

Please contact us for any information

My favorite Winter Treat ! Italian Hot Chocolate

Hot chocolate Recipe

Italy is famous for their Cioccolato Caldo, especially during the fall and winter months. This hot chocolate is sometimes served so thick (like a pudding), that you need a spoon to actually eat it! this recipe doesn’t make it that thick. The luxurious richness comes from using top-quality chocolate.

hot-chocolate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What You Will Need:

  1. 4 ounces bittersweet chocolate 70% or higher
  2. 1 1/2 cups whole milk
  3. 2 tablespoons sugar
  4. 2 teaspoons corn starch

What To Do:

  1. Into a saucepan over LOW heat add chocolate and a drop of milk. Stir with a wooden spoon until melted.
  2. SLOWLY add remaining milk until it’s well combined. Add sugar. Mix to combine. Whisk in corn starch.
  3. Continue cooking over LOW heat until it becomes thick, creamy and coats the back of the wooden spoon.

Hot chocolate Italian-style is one of the most amazing treats in the world! You have to try this pudding-like chocolate decadence! Add some Irish cream, cinnamon, and whipped cream for a fun variation, or create your own!”

I suggest some petit four or sweet canapes and  sandwich to serve your afternoon tea

ideal party

a delice !!!

for Chocolate lover watch the chocolat movie you will like it !!

chocolat trailer

a Bientot

Bertrand Munier

www.bertrandmunier.co.uk 

bertrand munier

Impress your guests this Christmas Season ..

The best christmas Parties design By Ideal Party and Liquidchefs .

Idealparty Picture 2DSC_0076

For your Christmas canapes party you need the best !!

That’s why we are different from other – We make our business to be the absolute best. To source the best ingredients for our canapes, to hire the best chefs, the best waiters,  the best menu designers, the best barmen , and to make your party simply exceptional

Idealparty Picture 1

For this christmas Ideal party is delighted  to introduce Liquid chefs to make portable bars run like a well oiled machine. the bars are designed to enhance your events and all specialisation have one Goal To take care of every stylish detail and leave the fun to you …

From private  Canapes party to Corporate party Ideal party and Liquid chefs can design the unforgettable christmas party !!

You can as well order your canapes Online …

Or Private cocktail party with butlers and chef ..

For any information email Bertrand Munier Chef@bertrandmunier.com

Chef Bertrand Munier was enthroned as Disciples of Escoffier .

Disciples of Escoffier Award

On the 11th of October 2013 the Association Culinaire Francaise and the Disciples of Escoffier organized their gala black tie dinner dance in the prestigious Landmark Hotel in London.

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landmark hotel

Many Chefs and people involved in the Catering Industry were invited by Jacques Pasquier, President of the Association Culinaire Francaise, and President of the Disciples of Escoffier UK, for a 5 course menu .

Prior to the dinner new Disciples of Auguste Escoffier had Been enthroned :

Pascal Aussignac from Club Gascon, David Collard from Colbert, Bertrand Munier from self catering Ideal Party, Pierre Julien Rebuzzi Pastry chef from Landmark Hotel, Nicolas Laridan from le Boudin Blanc, Robert Kendrew from Scotland, Michael Godfrey from Eton College, Thomas Maieli from Mr Duck, Myriam Lombard Sommeliere from Ritz Casino, Mare Wessels Banqueting manager from Landmark Hotel.

Bertrand Munier

Menu

Boudin blanc, cepe puree, trumpet mushrooms, port jus  – Crozes Hermitage Domaine Mule blanche~ ~ ~

Seared and tartar of mackerel,

 horseradish and beetroot – La Cote d”Heux Cotes de Gascogne

~ ~ ~

Fillet of Scottish beef ‘Rossini’
, boulangere potato, tender stem broccoli and Chantenay carrot – Chateau La  Lagune Haut Medoc

~ ~ ~

Assiette of farmhouse cheese, chutney and crispbreads- Chateau Cherchy-Desqueyroux Graves

~ ~ ~

Dark chocolate cone, Vanilla panacotta, macerated raspberries, warm chocolate sauce

~ ~ ~

Coffee and petit fours

 We would like to thanks ACF & Disciples of Escoffier UK 

 and  for the fantastic evening.

what About Auguste Escoffier

Now, you can explore the traditions and methods of the father of classic cuisine!

Click for more ….  http://www.escoffier.edu/about/about-auguste-escoffier/

The Best British Classic, The Christmas Pudding

History and Tradition of Christmas Pudding

Does your Christmas dinner include a Christmas Pudding? If you lived in England, the absence of this delectable dessert from the holiday table would raise a few eyebrows. The pudding is the most special part of the meal, although families alter the way it’s cooked and presented to create their own unique traditions. Originally the Christmas Pudding was referred to as hakin because of its multitude of ingredients.

In 1714, King George I re-established pudding as part of the Christmas feast even though the Quakers strongly objected. Meat was eliminated from the recipe in the 17th century in favor of more sweets, and people began sprinkling it with brandy and setting it aflame when serving it to their guests. The Christmas pudding was not a tradition in England until it was introduced to the Victorians by Prince Albert. By this time the pudding looked and tasted as it does today. The traditional cooking time takes about eight hours, with preparation taking even longer due to extensive marinating. The longer the fruit is marinated in brandy, cider, or both, the better it tastes and this could take weeks!

Ingredients

225g/8oz golden caster sugar
225g/8oz vegetarian suet
340g/12oz sultanas
340g/12oz raisins
225g/8oz currants
110g/4oz candied peel, chopped
110g/4oz plain flour
110g/4oz fresh white breadcrumbs
55g/2oz flaked almonds
1 lemon, zest only
5 eggs, beaten
1 evel tsp ground cinnamon
1 level tsp mixed spice
5g/1 level tsp freshly grated nutmeg
pinch of salt
150ml/5fl oz brandy or rum
Method

1. Lightly grease 4x600ml/1 pint or 2×1.2 litre/2 pint pudding basins.
2. Mix together all the dry ingredients.
3. Stir in the eggs and brandy and mix well.
4. Spoon the mix into basins. Put a circle of baking parchment and foil over the top of each basin and tie securely with string. Make a string handle from one side of the basin to the other so it is easier to pick the basin out of the pan after cooking.
5. Put the basins in a large steamer of boiling water and cover with a lid. Boil for 5-6 hours, topping the boiling water up from time to time, if necessary. If you do not have a steamer, put the basins in a large pan on inverted saucers on the base. Pour in boiling water to come a third of the way up the sides of the pudding bowls. Cover and steam as before.
6. Cool. Change the baking parchment and foil covers for fresh ones and tie up as before. Store in a cool cupboard until Christmas Day.
7. To serve: steam for 2 hours and serve with brandy butter, rum sauce, cream or homemade custard.
Bon appetit
Bertrand Munier

what about cooking your own foie gras for christmas

How to devein a lobe foie gras (duck)

Video shows you step by step how to separate the two lobes, remove the veins and clean the foie gras, the process of devening foie gras is really very easy

How to cook a terrine of foie gras

In Gascony, foie gras is often cooked in a porcelain terrine in a water bath, then served in its terrine along with a serving spoon and a small bowl of hot water. Each person dips his spoon in the water to heat it so it will cut neatly through the liver. He then scoops out a portion and smears it on a slab of grilled coarse French bread.

A more elegant presentation is to slice the foie gras, then arrange the slices on a porcelain plate surrounded with chopped aspic and lightly toasted brioche. The foie gras can also be served with a variety of greens, flavored with a vinaigrette made with verjus and walnut oil.

The preparation and resting times for this terrine are 5 to 7 days, so plan accordingly. Begin about 1 week before serving.

Ingredients

  • 2 fresh Artisan duck foie gras, about 1½ pounds each
  • 1 tablespoon fine sea salt
  • 1½ teaspoons finely ground white pepper

Devein the foie gras see video

Put lobes in an earthenware dish and season with salt and pepper, spices and sugar, then gently rub into lobes.
then cover and chill for at least 12 hours, turning from time to time.Arrange in a terrine dish lined with clingfilm (let a little hang over each edge), of roughly 16cm x 11cm x 7cm, with the largest lobe at the bottom.
Cook the terrine in a bain-marie (a bowl over 2cm of boiling water), or in an oven at 180°C (350°F) for 40 minutes.
Once cooked, remove from oven and leave to rest at room temperature for a couple of hours, then keep in fridge.
Serve chilled, with a glass of chilled Monbazillac, Sauternes or Champagne.

Advice :

This is a relatively simple recipe, which depends mainly on the quality of the foie gras that you use, so try to find Grade A wherever possible.

   

if you wish you can order it on line

menu christmas 2011 PDF

Bertrand